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St Michael and St John's

Roman Catholic Primary School

Following the example of Jesus, together we learn, love and respect one another to be the best we can be.

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School Logo

St Michael and St John's

Roman Catholic Primary School

Following the example of Jesus, together we learn, love and respect one another to be the best we can be.

Computing

The Purpose of studying Computing:

The use of information and communication technology is an integral part of the National Curriculum and is a key skill for everyday life. Computers, tablets, programmable robots, digital and video cameras are a few of the tools that can be used to acquire, organise, store, manipulate, interpret, communicate and present information. At SSMJ, we recognise that pupils are entitled to quality hardware and software and a structured and progressive approach to the learning of the skills needed to enable them to use it effectively. The computing curriculum at SSMJ is carefully planned and structured to ensure that current learning is linked to previous learning and that the school’s approaches are informed by current pedagogy. The purpose of this policy is to state how the school intends to make this provision.

 

Aims:

The National Curriculum (2014) presents the subject as one lens through which pupils can understand the world. There is a focus in computational thinking and creativity, as well as opportunities for creative work in programming and digital media. The introduction makes clear the three aspects of the Computing curriculum: computer science (CS), information technology (IT) and digital literacy (DL).  Online safety is embedded within all the areas as well as being taught explicitly (for more information, refer to the Online safety policy.) The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digital literate- able to use and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology- at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

 

In line with the national curriculum 2014, the curriculum at SSMJ aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Will understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation.
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.
  • Will evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Will be responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology;
  • Will develop the cross-curricular use of Computing in all subjects.

 

Through providing appropriate experiences, children will achieve computing competence, acquiring knowledge about the application and implications of computing, the necessary skills to apply computing skills in a variety of contexts and a better understanding of the role and potential of ICT.

 

Intent:
Computing is held in high regard at SSMJ.  Through teaching computing, we equip our children to participate in a rapidly changing world where work and leisure activities are increasingly transformed by technology. It is our intention to enable children to find, explore, analyse, exchange and present information. The computing curriculum at SSMJ makes full use of resources through the use of the computer suite as well as tablets; making links, where possible, with our faith, which is at the heart of our curriculum.

The school’s aims are to:

  • Meet the requirements of the National Curriculum programmes of study for computing.
  • Provide a relevant, challenging and enjoyable curriculum for computing for all pupils.
  • Use ICT and computing as a tool to enhance learning throughout the curriculum.
  • To respond to new developments in technology.
  • To equip pupils with the confidence and capability to use ICT and computing throughout their later life.
  • To develop the understanding of how to use ICT and computing safely and responsibly.

 

The National Curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles of computer science, including logic, algorithms, data representation, and communication.
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.
  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

 

Implementation:
Computing is a foundation subject in the National Curriculum. The school uses the programmes of study from the National Curriculum (2014) and a Computing scheme that the school has adopted as the basis for our curriculum planning.

We carry out the curriculum planning in Computing in three phases (long-term, medium-term and short-term). The long-term plan maps the Computing topics that the children study in each term during each key stage, and follows the progression document. The Computing subject leader devises this in conjunction with teaching colleagues in each year group, and the children often study Computing as part of their work in other subject areas. Our long-term Computing plan shows how teaching units are distributed across the year groups, and how these fit together to ensure progression within the curriculum plan.

Our medium-term plans, which teachers are expected to adapt and modify using the guidance from the CAS website to suit their children’s interest, current events, their own teaching style, the use of any support staff and the resources available, ensuring secure links with the Religious Education curriculum.  These are set out on an agreed, consistent format for the Medium Term Plan, which includes headings such as ‘prior knowledge, key vocabulary, assessment opportunities (prior, interim and post) and key skills’ this format also includes space for the knowledge organiser for each topic.  We must ensure that any modification does not overlook any areas of the objectives for the year groups/ Key stages, and so use the progression document. They identify the key learning objectives for each unit of work, and stipulate the curriculum time that we devote to it. The Computing subject leader is responsible for keeping and reviewing these plans.

The topics studied in Computing are planned to build on prior learning (see computing progression document). While we offer opportunities for children of all abilities to develop their skills and knowledge in each unit, we also plan progression into the scheme of work, so that the children are increasingly challenged as they move up through the school.

Planning is in line with the national curriculum. Teachers’ lesson design is informed by national agencies e.g. through the school’s membership of the Computing At School (CAS).

Parents and carers are required to give signed authorisation before their child can use the Internet, either in guided or in independent school work. It is the role of the subject leader to ensure all signed authorisation is in place.  Parents and carers are, however, assured that their child’s use of the Internet at school is always supervised. A record of those children who do not have permission to use the Internet at school is held by each class teacher and by the school office. This forms part of the home-school agreement and the acceptable use contract.

 

At SSMJ we use a variety of tools to develop computing skills through the use of remote learning and children’s individual and collective portfolios on Dojo.  We are also developing the role of Digital Leaders within school to enable children to peer coach as well as linking to the wider community and developing skills of others.

 

Impact
After the implementation of this robust computing curriculum, children at SSMJ will be digitally literate and able to join the rest of the world on its digital platform.  They will be equipped, not only with the skills and knowledge to use technology effectively and for their own benefit, but more importantly – safely.  The biggest impact we want on our children is that they understand the consequences of using the internet and that they are also aware of how to keep themselves safe online.

 

As children become more confident in their abilities in Computing, they will become more independent and key life skills such as problem-solving, logical thinking and self-evaluation become second nature.

 

Children will learn key vocabulary and should be to recall this in everyday life. We aim for children to have a knowledge and understanding of computer programmes through writing and debugging code, children will be able to solve problems using technology and computational thinking is encouraged. Children will build resilience through their work and are encouraged to learn from their mistakes. We are actively teaching skills for children to become confident in an ever-growing digital world.

 

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